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Environmental Compliance
APS Division of Support Services

1369 Airport Blvd.
Aurora, CO 80011
303-367-3000 x28682
Rita Davis
- Manager

Decontamination & Disposal

Decontamination/Disinfection - A two step processDecontamination is the removal of visible contamination.  For small cleanups, decontamination involves removing all visible material using a disposable cloth, such as a paper towel.  For large cleanup, decontamination includes the application of a sanitary absorbent, such as Voban or Red Z to the body fluid spill.  Once the spill is absorbed or solidified, sweep up the material and place in a plastic trash can liner for disposal.


 Disinfection is the process of cleansing the contaminated area of harmful microorganisms.  Approved disinfectant agents must be registered with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as effective against HBV and HIV. The EPA approves disinfectant products based on effectiveness against certain microorganisms.

  • List B are products effective against tuberculosis
  • List C are products effective against HIV
  • List D are products effective against HBV and HIV

In order to determine if a product is EPA approved, the EPA registration number must be checked against Lists B, C, and D.  The EPA lists are also available on the internet at http://www.epa.gov/oppad001/chemregindex.htm.    If the product is not listed on list D, it has not been EPA approved for HBV and HIV and cannot be used for disinfection purposes. 

Quat-Stat is an example of a quaternary ammonium chloride disinfectant effective against HIV and HBV.  Refer to the Custodial Approved Products List to find the District recommended disinfectant products.

Practices for cleanup of incidents involving body fluids

Washable hard surfaces, such as desks, chairs, tables and floors:

  1. Put on disposable gloves.
  2. Wipe up small soiled areas with paper towels or tissues. After visible material is removed, use clean paper towels, soap and water to clean area.
  3.  Apply a sanitary absorbent, such as Voban or Red Z for larger soiled areas. After the spill is absorbed, sweep up material and discard in a plastic lined waste container.
  4.  Disinfect the area with the District recommended EPA-approved disinfectant, such as Quat-Stat according to the manufacturer's instructions.
  5.  Discard all disposable cleaning supplies into a plastic lined waste container.
  6.  Any contaminated equipment must be cleaned and disinfected also. A person handling such equipment should use gloves until the disinfection is complete. 
  7.  If used, soak mop in disinfectant solution for a minimum of 20 minutes and rinse thoroughly.
  8.  Used disinfectant solution should be promptly poured down the drain.
  9. Remove and discard gloves in the plastic lined waste receptacle, tie bag closed, place in another plastic liner, tie second bag closed and dispose in the normal trash.
  10.  Wash hands thoroughly when cleanup is complete.

NOTE: Do not use Quat-Stat on finished floor surfaces as it may damaged or remove the finish.

Carpets, rugs and upholstery

NOTE: For these type of items, the area is sanitized to reduce bacteria to a "safe level."

  1. Put on disposable gloves.
  2. Apply a sanitary absorbent, such as Voban or Red Z to soiled areas. After the spill is absorbed, sweep up the bulk of the material and vacuum the area.
  3.  Apply a sanitary shampoo using a sanitizing carpet cleaner method (water extraction) according to the manufacturer=s instructions.
  4.  Mist the area with a EPA approved disinfectant, such as Quat-Stat.
  5. Discard all disposable cleaning supplies and vacuum contents into a plastic lined waste container.
  6. Any contaminated equipment must be cleaned and disinfected also. A person handling such equipment should use gloves until the disinfection is complete. 
  7.  Used carpet cleaner and water solution should be promptly poured down the drain.
  8. Remove and discard gloves in the plastic lined waste receptacle, tie bag closed, place in another plastic liner, tie second bag closed and dispose in the normal trash.
  9. Wash hands thoroughly when cleanup is complete.

How Do I Dispose of the Waste?Two types of waste, (contaminated and regulated biohazardous) can be generated from a cleanup involving potentially infectious body fluids or materials. 


GLOVES SHOULD BE WORN AND UNIVERSAL PRECAUTIONS SHOULD ALWAYS BE OBSERVED, REGARDLESS OF WASTE TYPE. Contaminated Waste is the usual first aid waste materials found at a school site.  Soiled bandages, used Kleenex, bloody gauze from wound cleaning and small nose bleeds, soiled sanitary napkins, used gloves, etc, are considered contaminated waste.  Contaminated waste may be disposed of in the regular trash, however, it must be double bagged first.


Regulated Biohazardous Waste consists of contaminated items that would release liquid or semi-liquid when compressed, and items caked with dried blood or other potentially infectious materials and are capable of releasing these materials during handling.  Items that fall into the regulated biohazardous waste category must be placed in a red  biohazard disposal bag. Sharps, such as used needles, syringes and contaminated broken glass are also considered regulated waste and must be placed into a red biohazard sharps container.To obtain red biohazard bags, biohazard sharps containers or when regulated biohazardous waste (red bag waste or a full sharps container) is generated  at your site, contact the Environmental Compliance Section at 367-3000 extension 28682, for proper disposal methods. 



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Environmental Compliance
Division of Support Services